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Sugar Plum

We received this variety of Tomato from two separate donors, Mrs Winch of Bristol and Mr O’Connor of Colchester, in response to our Seed Search appeal in the late 1990s. Both donors had been saving their own seed for more than 25 years. The grape-shaped, sweet, red tomatoes grow in large clusters and ripen early. This variety came out on top in taste tests at Garden Organic, consistently described as “excellent”.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

My Girl

Sara Furse of Clwyd donated this variety to HSL, and describes it as follows “A tomato with very little seed compared to flesh. Originally from George Roberts Seedsmen of Daventry, some time in the 1950s”. It is a prolific producer of medium to large, plum-shaped fruit that are pinkish in colour. A very thin-skinned, sweet tomato, excellent for cooking because of the lack of bitter seeds, and also great for slicing. Larger fruit can keep for several weeks.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Grandpa's Cress

Our donor, Mr W H Shercliff, passed this variety to us as it has been grown in his family for at least three generations. He says “It germinates very easily and produces a crop in only a few weeks, which can be cut off with scissors 3 or 4 times”. A broad, serrated-leaved garden cress with a strong peppery flavour and tender texture. The flavour of the leaves gets stronger the higher up the plant you go. Can be grown in a pot all year round.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Navy Bean Edmund

Formerly known as ‘Navy Bean’ this variety came to us from Harlow Carr Botanic Gardens. It is believed that Navy beans were first cultivated to sustain Australian forces during WWII. The compact, branching plants have white flowers followed by a heavy yield of short, green pods containing small, round beans. Principally used as a drying bean, but can also be eaten as a green bean too.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Madeley

This kale was given to us by Mrs Withers, who included a note saying that the kale may have been grown in her garden since the 17th Century. A large plant with soft, grey-green leaves, surprisingly sweet and tender with a mild flavour. Both leaves and shoots are good to eat. Easy to grow and untroubled by pests.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.


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