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Dwarf French beans

Dwarf French beans


Arranesco

Donated in the early 1990s by Harlow Carr Botanic Garden, Harrogate. Prolific and early, this mild-flavoured bean has slender pods that are best eaten when young and tender. The dried seeds turn orange/brown with a black eye, although they are best when used fresh. Keep picking the pods as this encourages more to be produced.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Black African Bean

New for 2011. Another variety donated to HSL by John Yeoman, who suggests that it is ideal for small spaces or containers. It will also require supports, as it is an intermediate type (somewhere between climber and dwarf). The pretty lilac flowers are followed by light green, slightly curved pods, which are delicious when young and tender.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Black Canterbury

A prolific and vigorous variety producing bushy plants and pretty pinkish-mauve flowers. Some of the flat, slightly curved green pods develop pink patternation as they age. Eat young to avoid stringiness; but the black beans can also be used dried. Seed Guardian Edna Squires says this is a “must-have” plant.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Dwarf Horticultural

A compact, yet prolific variety that produces attractive white flowers with a slight pink blush. The flat, straight, tender pods turn from green to yellow with pink marbling and are delicious when eaten young. However, the green beans can also be podded and used in salads, and the pretty dried beans are ideal for use in succotash.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Early Warwick

Known in England before 1890, this bean is early, reliable and prolific. Compact plants produce lilac flowers followed by green pods, which are stringless when young. Also excellent as a dried bean, when the beans have attractive pink-maroon mottles. Seed Guardian Eluned Paramor found that it “thrived on drought, deluge, neglect and TLC!”

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Eastern Butterwax

Martin Roberts of Bicester originally donated this variety, which he obtained from a company in Ontario. They stopped stocking it because it “fails modern uniformity standards”; even though until then it was known for “its exceptional flavour”. Produces a substantial crop of creamish-yellow pods, which have a sweet, beany flavour when blanched.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Emperor of Russia

Another variety from Harlow Carr Botanic Garden, this fine haricot bean has neat plants producing white flowers followed by slim and crisp pencil pods. When picked young they are stringless and flavoursome, but tend not to freeze well. Seed Guardian Bill Dale comments, “I probably shouldn’t say it but in the many years I’ve grown it I’ve had no disease or other problems. A crisp and crunchy treat when eaten fresh and young. A good, no-nonsense bean!”

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Ernie's Big Eye

Donated in the early 1980s by American Member Russell Crow, this selection of the ancient ‘Trout’ variety produces pale-green, luscious young pods, or if allowed to dry, milky white seeds speckled with burgundy. Carries pods high on the compact plants so may need staking later in the season. Found to be particularly disease resistant.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Magpie

A rare heirloom introduced from France in 1913 by Carter’s Seed Company. This is a late variety producing strong plants and a good yield of attractive pods. These slim pods are best eaten young, however, they can also be allowed to dry when the attractive bi-coloured black and white seeds are ideal for soups and stews.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Navy Bean Edmund

Formerly known as ‘Navy Bean’ this variety came to us from Harlow Carr Botanic Gardens. It is believed that Navy beans were first cultivated to sustain Australian forces during WWII. The compact, branching plants have white flowers followed by a heavy yield of short, green pods containing small, round beans. Principally used as a drying bean, but can also be eaten as a green bean too.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Peewit

New for 2011. This bean came to us from Jill Rushenbrooke who had acquired them from Dave Twinberrow, an elderly gardening friend. It originated in Holland, and Mr Twinberrow has grown them since the late 1960s. Their name relates to the appearance of the dried beans, which were thought to look like peewit (lapwing) eggs. The compact plants (30-40cm) produce a profusion of green pods with attractive pinkish mottling, ideal as green beans when very young, but perfect for use as a dried bean.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Soldier

This old variety (pre 1800) is so named as it has markings around the hilem (the part of the seed which attaches to the pod) resembling a soldier standing to attention. Thought to be drought tolerant, it produces short (30-45cm) bushy, branching plants and a generous crop of tasty beans that can be eaten as a green bean, but best used dried.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Yugoslavian Black Bean

Donated by Mrs Vera Patrick who acquired them from a fellow allotment holder. Bushy plants yield pretty bi-coloured lilac flowers and a substantial crop of flat, green pods. Mrs Patrick says, “They are very prolific, handsome and stringless too, worth having indeed!” Let us know what you think about the flavour of this one.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.


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