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Other varieties

Squash

Squash Cucurbita maxima and C. pepo

The common-name classification of squashes, pumpkins, gourds, marrows, etc. is fraught with difficulties. Essentially, summer squashes are good fresh and do not store long. Winter squashes and pumpkins will store well, particularly if allowed to cure in a warm place, but can also be eaten immature in summer. For all types, sow individually into pots (with some warmth) in late May, transplanting into their final positions when danger of frost has passed. Sow at least three seeds to ensure that, if one plant is mainly producing male flowers, there is a higher probability that there will be a female flower on another plant for pollination. Placing seeds on their edge may help to avoid seed rot. Seeds can also be sown directly once all danger of frost has passed and the soil is warm. Allow lots of space (1-1.5m) and incorporate plenty of organic matter. More room is required for trailing types and we tend to train them around themselves. Pollination is needed for good fruit set, and can be done by hand if insects are scarce. Hand-pollination is essential if the seeds are to be saved. On winter squash do not allow too many fruits to develop, as the plants need to put their energy into ripening fruit for storage. Summer squash can be allowed to produce lots of fruit as they are continually harvested when ready (it should still be possible to penetrate the skin with a thumbnail). Water well throughout the growing season. Harvest winter squash when the vines have been cut down by frost. Allow the fruits to ripen further in the sun for several weeks after harvest for maximum storage time. Varieties within one species cross readily.

Greek

A bushy variety that is very productive and just keeps on going. The fruits are light green with pale green flesh and can be eaten young, or allowed to grow to hefty marrow proportions.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Maltese Marrow

A large plant requiring room to sprawl. The small, green, slightly flattened fruit form later in the season. This variety did well in an HSL ‘taste test’, comments included “sweet”, “appetising” and “ideal for pumpkin pie”. Let us know what you think.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Queensland Blue

New for 2011. Donated by Alan Vincent this variety is very popular in Australia, but also does well over here. The fruits are a dark, almost metallic, blue with deep furrows, contrasting superbly with the vivid orange flesh. Perfect for stuffing, but also delicious when the flesh is boiled and mashed with butter.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

White Serpent

This variety produces long, pale green squashes which turn yellow as they ripen. Looking more like a cucumber it has delicious, sweet flesh.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Zapallito de Toscana

Producing dark green to purple fruits with orange pulp, this variety smells like melon but has a more savoury flavour. It is a bush, rather than trailing variety, which reliably produces fruit for summer or winter use, as it eventually develops a hard, waxy rind. This variety grew particularly well in trials at Ryton.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.


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