a Adopt a Veg

Jump to content

Adopt a veg

Find a veg

Other varieties

Pea

Pea (Pisum sativum)

Round-seeded varieties are hardier than the wrinkled-seeded types and can be sown directly in the ground at a depth of 2-5cm, spaced 5cm apart in wide drills. You may well need to protect against rodents and we tend to sow into wooden crates, transplanting when around 5cm tall. Sow round peas from late winter onwards, switching to wrinkled varieties after late March to provide a succession of fresh pods. Dwarf varieties need some support from twigs inserted densely into the row when the seedlings are still young. Most of the old varieties are very tall and need to be supported on netting, strings or grown up a structure of canes. They are better sown in single rows or at stations along their supports. These tall varieties are the sweetest and stand for longer without losing their flavour. They also crop for longer if picked regularly. To save seed, leave some pods on the plants to dry. Pea varieties do not readily cross-pollinate.

Carlin

The family of our donor, J Freeman, have grown this variety for more than 100 years. Originally given to her great, great grandfather as a wedding present, this ancient round pea dates back to at least Elizabethan times. Protein rich (about 25%) Carlin is a classic drying pea, still traditionally eaten in northern England on the Sunday before Palm Sunday, known regionally as Carlin Sunday. The peas are soaked in brine overnight, boiled and eaten with salt and vinegar or doused in beer or mint sauce. Others say that the tradition commemorates the arrival of a shipload of peas in besieged Newcastle upon Tyne in 1644, saving many from starvation. Attractive pink and lilac flowers are followed by pods of small, brown mottled seeds.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Commander

Donated in the early 1970s by Owen Lee who commented “This is a brown pea that a friend got for me from Holland. It is excellent for cooking and drying.” Could be from a series of patriotically named peas from after the Great War, like the ‘Admiral’. Phillip Humphrey reports this is an “aristocrat amongst peas, it grows to over 2m; the large purple pods, which contain green peas, are simply delicious.” Cynthia Alves comments, “With pretty magenta and blue flowers followed by purple pods it makes picking easy and worthy to grow in a flower bed.” Long-time Seed Guardian Sue Atherley of Liverpool’s Croxteth Hall says, “It is best lightly cooked and served in rice or salads.”

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Duke of Albany

Originally supplied by Robinson’s seed Company, Lancaster. Our donor, Mrs Whitely of Hornby, Lancashire obtained this variety in 1971 and has been saving the seed ever since. Seed Guardian Martin Robinson says, “These are my favourite of the tall varieties, so prolific and the sweetest taste ever”. Described by Vilmorin-Andrieux (1885), it is a tall (2.1m), vigorous variety requiring sturdy supports. White flowers are followed by long dark green pods, with up to ten delicious peas in each. Excellent raw or cooked, and also freezes well.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Epicure

Thought to have been introduced in 1893 this vigorous pea can grow to 2-3m tall and will need sturdy supports. The large pods can be eaten as mange-tout when immature, but are best when the pods are just full, yielding large sweet peas that freeze well.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Freer's Mummy Pea

New for 2011. Grown in the Freer family since 1945 and originally from a gardener on Lord Carnarvon’s Estate. It is described as being ‘tall, sweet and tender’; let us know what you think.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Glory of Devon

A popular West Country maincrop variety more than 100 years ago, this pea was repatriated by W W Weaver from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) collection. A tall (around 2m) variety requiring strong supports, it has white flowers followed by pods of small, sweet peas, produced over a long period of time. Guardian Karen Skeates says these are a “dainty pea” with “extraordinary sweetness”.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Gravedigger

Our donor, A J Wastell, was given seeds of this variety by retired farmer Mr Thompson, who in turn had received the peas from the local gravedigger, hence the name. Beautiful white flowers are followed by pods full of juicy peas, with great flavour both raw and cooked.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Harold Idle

Our donor, Robert Page, and his family have grown this variety for more than 50 years. It was originally given to Mr Page’s father by his neighbour at Desborough Allotments, Northamptonshire; a Mr Harold Idle. A tall pea (around 1.8m) it requires early sowing (March) to provide vigorous and productive plants. White flowers give way to large, well-filled pods that are delicious when eaten fresh.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Irish Preans

Passed to our donor, David Medd, by the secretary of the Saltburn Allotment Society. The seeds were originally obtained from an Agricultural Research Station in Ireland and thought to be a cross between a pea and a broad bean. They grow to around 8 feet and produce blue flowers followed by medium-sized pods containing 4-5 seeds in each.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Latvian

Called ‘peleks zirnis’ in Latvian, meaning ‘grey peas’, this type of pea is grown across Latvia and traditionally eaten with fried fatty pork and onions. Our sample was brought back from Riga on a tourist coach! After overnight soaking and use the dried peas as an alternative to chickpeas. The pink and crimson bicoloured flowers are particularly large and as attractive as ornamental sweet peas.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Laxton's Exquisite

A tall, wrinkled, maincrop pea that produces (as so many of these old varieties of pea do) over a long period of time and at a good height for picking to be a pleasure. Relive those days of garden peas tasting sweet fresh from the garden, and leave the freezer empty for sweetcorn. Medium height, to 1.5m, needing support with sticks or netting. Seed Guardian Elizabeth Dennis told us “The flavour lives up to its name – truly exquisite”.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Lincolnshire

New for 2011. Donated by Rita Inchley, this fairly short (1.2m) variety, which produces white flowers and plump pods packed full of juicy wrinkled peas.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Llanover

New for 2011. This is a tall, vigorous variety that needs strong pea sticks to support the large, green pods produced. They were grown for many years on the Llanover Estate in Wales from seeds brought to the UK by a German prisoner of war (WWI). Once the war was over he returned to marry a Welsh girl and continued to work on the estate.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Magnum Bonum

Dating back to the 1860s our donor, Dr Robb-Smith, passed seed to HSL during the 1980s as his friends family had grown the variety in Devon for many years. A strong, reliable and vigorous maincrop variety growing to more than 1.8m and producing an abundance of thick pods well filled with juicy, flavoursome peas that can be picked over several weeks.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Panthers

Mr Tear, whose family had grown these peas in the area around Desborough, Northamptonshire, since 1895, gave this variety to our donor, Malcolm Lumb. Growing to around 1.2m the ‘tidy’ plants are ideal for growing in small areas. White flowers give way to green pods packed with peas that are sweet and full of flavour. Guardian Roger Lerpiniere says, “The pods are about 12cm long with an average of 9 seeds per pod”.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Prew's Special

Donated by Peter Feltham of Dymock in Gloucestershire and sent to us with an intriguing postscript at the end of the letter, “…apparently the peas originated in Egypt.” Many letters and phone calls later, we traced them back to a gardener at Lord Portman’s Estate in Dorset during the 1920s. The son of the then Lord Portman was said to have been given the peas by Lord Carnarvon, who allegedly found them when he opened the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922. A few months after opening the tomb Lord Carnarvon was struck dead, it was said, by the mummy’s curse. Seed Guardian Phillip Humphrey reports this is a “reasonable pea in both size and quality. Branches out enthusiastically – good taste, heavy cropper.”

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Purple Pod

Donated by the Seed Savers Exchange, Iowa, this variety produces tall plants (2.2-2.5m) with bicoloured purple flowers. We have very little information about this variety so your comments would be particularly welcome.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Simpson's Special

Donated by the Rural Life Museum in Norfolk, this variety has been grown in Sussex for at least the last 50 years. A medium-height (1.4m plus), productive pea producing delicate white flowers followed by large curved pods averaging around 7 marrowfat-type peas per pod. Let us know how they taste.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Sutton's Harbinger

New for 2011. Developed by the famous plant breeder Thomas Laxton in 1872, this variety achieved an Award of Merit from the RHS in 1901. “A sweet pea. Very good eating straight from the garden”, says Guardian Roger Pawling. Guardians John & Gil Boardman found this pea to have “good flavour, both as salad pea and cooked”.

Tutankhamun

Another Pea variety thought to be originally from the garden of Lord Carnarvon at Highclere Castle, Berkshire who, along with Howard Carter, discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in November 1922. Could this variety be a descendant of the peas allegedly taken from the tomb? A tall pea (1.5-1.8m) that produces its white flowers and pods of sweet tasting peas at the top of the plants, making them easy to pick.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.

Ultra-U

This variety was given to our donor, Mr Reynolds, by a fellow member of the Northern Ireland Organic Gardening Society. He had personally saved the variety since the 1970s, however, they have been grown for three generations in Ireland. A tall pea potentially growing to around 2.5m, with creamish-white flowers and slightly curved green pods packed full of large, sweet peas.

Please note: this variety needs a little bit more of a helping hand, so we are not able to send out seeds with gifts, however by adopting it you will be directly contributing to its conservation, so that one day we will be able to make it available to everyone.


All content © Garden Organic | Registered Charity No 298104

FacebookTwitterYou TubeFlickr

Items: 0
£0.00

View Basket Checkout Set up a Wish listSign up for our newsletterDiscover more about
Garden Organic
Garden organicSecure site